Nine Factors to Consider When Picking Your Hotel Bath Refinisher

So you’ve decided it’s THE time to renovate your hotel. Maybe you’re doing a complete overhaul… New floors, new suites, new and luxurious baths. Or maybe you’re renovating strategically: doing complete renovations in key, strategic areas like the common spaces, and “freshening up” your guest suites, with baths that shine and sparkle.

industrial experience in hotel bath remodeling

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Whichever direction you’re going, picking the right professional to help you accomplish your vision is critical.

Before you hire your bath and tile refinishing contractor, take some time to ensure you address the following:

Who are they? Are they local? Does the firm have a long-standing contact and web presence? Using local contractors can be critical to your project: they often know local building officials by name (or even on speed dial!), and those built in relationships can mean the difference in terms of getting things done quickly and efficiently.

How long have they been in business? Remodeling isn’t a trade that’s picked up in a day. And you certainly don’t want inexperienced trades doing bathrooms that your guests will be seeing and using (and reviewing online!) for years. Choosing a contractor who has stood the test of time is a sure step in the right direction.

What is their industrial experience? Hotel and industrial remodeling is VERY different from renovating your home bath. There’s different laws, different demands, more attention to longevity/durability (after all, we’re talking about a bath that will be used and abused by hundreds if not thousands of people each year, for 5-7 years before the next renovation.)

Is the contractor insured? This is a non-starter. Your contractor HAS to have a certificate of insurance specifically addressed to you or your hotel.

What certifications do they have? Particularly, is the contractor EPA certified? You want a contractor who is aware of (and abides by) laws are specific to construction, alterations and paint removal.

What is their reputation? Everyone is going to have wonderful testimonials on their websites. But ask around. Do you know people who have used the firm? What do they say? Pay attention to those who “have a reputation that

hotel staff cooperation during renovation

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precedes them” (both good and bad.) You want someone who has a strong reputation.

 

 

 

What are their resources? Different than a standard home remodel, a true hotel renovation expert can supply enough experienced professionals to do 10-20 rooms per floor, and do the job superbly: one beautiful caulking line right after another. They should have the proper equipment (and enough equipment) to do proper ventilation for the rooms being worked on. This is often where you will see the difference in your contractors: so pay attention to this detail.

Do they understand your business? Some people just don’t “get it.” You run a hotel. You have guests. Guests are demanding, change plans and complain. But guests are why you are in business (and why you want an amazing contractor). If you are renovating with guests in your hotel, then you’ve got to have a contractor who can improvise and adapt to guests who complain about noise, smells or just general traffic. What plans can your contractor put in place to address these common issues up front, but then ALSO adapt if more needs to be done? Further, the contractor has to be able to work with and around housekeeping and your other staff. Can they integrate themselves seamlessly into not just the renovation team, but also your operations team?

What’s included in

professional caulking lines hotel bath remodeling

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the job? Look for:

  • You’d think this would go without saying, but clean-up after the job is done. Of course you want your surfaces taped/masked to protect them. But those materials should not be left for housekeeping or engineering to be removed: that’s the contractor’s job.
  • Safety should not be optional: Non-slip finishes should be included in the scope of work as a safety measure.
  • Is the previous paint being removed? (The answer should be yes.)
  • Ensure the tub and tile is etched to remove shine and promote the new surface bonds properly.
  • Make sure you are getting high performing, top quality epoxy primers and Aliphatic acrylic enamels.
  • Attention to the details: make sure your contractor is committed to scraping all the grout lines, repairing chips, loose tiles and cracks and holes, finished by completely re-grouting all of the bath and tile areas to perfection. (Note: There is nothing more lovely than a flawless grout line.)

If you take each of these elements under consideration as you look for the right contractor for your hotel baths, you’ll be well on your way to a successful — and dare we say possibly even enjoyable – renovation experience.

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Comments ( 2 )

  1. ReplyOrlando
    Awesome, what can I say!
  2. ReplyChristina McCale
    ;-) Thanks for sharing your enthusiasm! I appreciate your comment! Finding the right partner - and I use that word quite strategically - is so important when you are considering a hotel renovation. They are helping you are with your hotel's "image" or brand. ... creating an experience the customer will enjoy and even share with others!

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